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Prospective Student-Athletes

If you are considering the decision to join the excellent tradition of Duquesne University athletics -or you are the parent of a child who hopes to do so - the Compliance Office wants to make the journey toward becoming a student-athlete at the Division I level as easy as possible.

At times, this process can be confusing, but the goal of this site is to offer helpful information and links pertaining to the areas of NCAA recruiting and eligibility regulations. Feel free to browse through this page to learn more...and best of luck!

To learn more about the Admissions process at Duquesne University click the link below:

http://duq.edu/admissions-and-aid/undergraduate-admissions

Visit the Duquesne University Financial Aid website to learn more about financial aid options that are available.

Top 5 Things a Prospective Student-Athlete Should Know

  1. Coaches are not allowed to return your call until after July 1 (except basketball) prior to you senior year in high school. However, you may call the coach at your expense anytime. A coach may not write or email you until September 1 of your junior year in high school, but you may write them at any time.
  2. A "Prospective Student-Athlete" is any student who has entered the 9th grade.
  3. A "Recruit" is an individual who has been contacted by a college coach and/or provided with an expensive paid visit to a college campus, and/or received a written offer for an athletic scholarship.
  4. An expensive-paid visit, also known as an Official Visit, is a visit to a college campus paid in whole or part by the college during a prospectâÂÂÂTMs senior year in high school. Each prospect is limited to a total of 5 official visits at the Division I level.
  5. All athletes who aspire to participate in sports at the college level, must be certified as a "Qualifier" by the NCAA Eligibility Center in order to practice, compete and receive athletic aid during their freshman year.

 


 

Incoming Freshmen

If you are a high school student about to graduate, you will need to be certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center. The NCAA Eligibility Center certifies both the academic and amateur credentials of all college-bound student-athletes who wish to compete in NCAA Division I athletics.

You are responsible for achieving and protecting your eligibility status!

The NCAA's Guide for the College Bound Student-Athlete provides the most comprehensive information in regards to the NCAA Eligibility Center process.

 

Incoming Freshmen: Academic Certification

The NCAA Eligibility Center verifies the academic and amateur status of all student-athletes who wish to compete in Division I athletics.

College-bound student-athletes who want to practice, compete and receive athletically related financial aid during their first year at a Division I school need to meet the following requirements:

  • Graduate from high school.
  • Complete a minimum of 16 core courses for Division I
  • Earn a minimum required grade-point average in core courses.
  • Earn a qualifying test score on either the ACT or SAT.
  • Request final amateurism certification from the NCAA Eligibility Center.

For Division I student-athletes who will enroll in August 2016 and later, the requirements to compete in the first year will change. In addition to the above standards, prospects must:

  • Graduate from high school
  • Earn at least a 2.3 grade-point average in core courses.
  • Successfully complete 10 of the 16 total required core courses before the start of their senior year in high school. Seven of the 10 courses must be successfully completed in English, math and science.

National Letter of Intent (NLI)

The National Letter of Intent is a binding agreement between a prospective student-athlete and an NLI member institution.

  • A prospective student-athlete agrees to attend the institution full-time for one academic year (two semesters or three quarters).
  • The institution agrees to provide athletics financial aid for one academic year.

To learn more about the NLI process visit their website: www.nationalletter.org/index.html

 

Incoming Freshmen: Amateurism Certification

Amateurism certification ensures that NCAA amateurism regulations are applied uniformly for incoming student-athletes. The process is a collaborative effort among student-athletes, NCAA member schools and the NCAA Eligibility Center., which determines initial amateur and academic eligibility.

As part of the process, each college-bound student-athlete is asked to answer several questions regarding his or her sports-participation history. This is to capture a better picture of the prospect's amateur status and to identify any potential issues that might conflict with NCAA rules. If the answers indicate a possible violation, the amateur-certification staff will work with the school to determine the facts. If the agreed-upon facts indicate a violation occurred, an eligibility penalty will be imposed based on the severity of the violations. Penalties include repayment of money, sitting out a specified number of games or, in rare cases, permanent ineligibility.

The following high school athletics activities may be reviewed in determining a college-bound student-athlete's amateurism status:

  • Contracts with a professional team.
  • Salary for participating in athletics.
  • Prize money.
  • Play with professionals.
  • Tryouts, practice or competition with a professional team.
  • Benefits from an agent or prospective agent.
  • Agreement to be represented by an agent.

 

Incoming Freshmen: Recruiting

Prior to September 1, at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year of high school, a coach may send the following information to a prospective student-athlete:

  • Camp brochures
  • Questionnaires.
  • NCAA Educational Information

After September 1, at the beginning of the prospective student-athlete's junior year of high school, a coach may send general correspondence related to athletics, including electronic correspondence.

Key Definitions to Know:

  • Official Visit: A visit to a college campus paid in whole or part by the college during a prospect's senior year in high school. Official visits can be no longer than 48 hours. A prospect is limited to 5 official visits (one per university). A prospect must submit a transcript and test score before coming to campus.
  • Unofficial Visit: A visit to a college campus at a prospect's expense. Colleges may only provide free tickets to an on-campus athletics event. No lodging, meals or transportation to campus may be provided. There is no limit on the number of unofficial visits a prospect may take.
  • Recruiting Contact: Any face to face, off-campus encounter between a prospect, prospect's parents, relatives or legal guardians and a college staff employee or athletic booster; if the conversation goes beyond a greeting.
  • Recruiting Evaluation: Any off-campus activity designed to assess a prospect's academic qualification or athletic ability. (Review of academic transcript or watch practice/game)

 


 

International Students

International student interested in coming to Duquesne University must also be certified through the NCAA Eligibility Center. Since each international college-bound student-athlete's academic circumstances are unique, the NCAA division and the respective country determines the standards.

The information provided on this site should help to guide you through the process of being certified through the NCAA Eligibility Center.

In addition, if you need additional information about getting admitted to Duquesne University, please visit the Office of International Programs website.

 

International Students: NCAA Eligibility Center

An international student-athlete must meet minimum academic standards in order to be eligible for practice, competition and athletics financial aid his or her first year. These standards are outlined in the Guide to International Academic Standards for Athletics Eligibility.

Since each international college-bound student-athlete's academic circumstances are unique, the NCAA division and the respective country determines the standards. A minimum score on either the ACT or the SAT plus an acceptable grade-point average is required. In addition, a minimum number of approved core courses must be achieved, which will be equivalent to a country's academic credential presented. And finally, proof of graduation must be included on the academic credential or submitted separately. Again, please consult the NCAA Guide to International Academic Standards for Athletics Eligibility to learn the requirements for an international college-bound student-athlete's country (countries).

The NCAA's Guide for the College Bound Student-Athlete provides the most comprehensive information in regards to the NCAA Eligibility Center process.

In addition, the International Student-Athlete Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) helps provide even more insight into the certification process for an international student.

 


 

Transfer Students

When you begin to think about transferring to a new school, understand that the rules are different depending on whether you want to transfer to an NCAA Division I, II or III school. Check out the following link for more information about transferring: http://www.ncaa.org/student-athletes/current/want-transfer

The rules also depend on whether you are currently enrolled at a two-year or a four-year school.

Please keep in mind that there are many rules governing transfer student-athletes. The information on below is meant to provide you with an understanding of how to begin the transfer process. For a deeper look at the rules and how they might affect you, please review the Transfer 101 guide below.

"Permission to Contact"

In general, if you are enrolled as a full-time student at an NCAA or National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) four-year school and you want to transfer to a different NCAA school to play, your current school's athletics director must give written permission-to-contact to the new coach or member of the athletics staff before you or your parents can talk with one of them.

That is called having a permission-to-contact letter. You may write to any NCAA school saying that you are interested in transferring, but the new coach cannot discuss transfer opportunities with you unless he or she has received written permission-to-contact from your current school.

How do I get a "permission to contact" letter?

Communication is key if you are interested in transferring. When requesting a "permission to contact" letter, talk to your current coach and/or current Compliance Officer about your decision to transfer and what schools you would like to have the "permission to contact" letter sent too. Then an athletics department staff member at your current school (i.e., Compliance Officer, or Athletic Director) will forward this letter to the school(s) you are interested in transferring, too.

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