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Alumni, Fans and Friends of Duquesne University

NCAA Booster Guidelines - "Know Your Role"

The Duquesne University Athletics Compliance Office is committed to assisting the Department of Athletics in reaching the objectives outlined by the NCAA. Duquesne University believes in the concept of shared compliance responsibilities, meaning it is important to "Know Your Role." Members of the athletics department, other institutional staff members, student-athletes as well as all individuals and (booster) groups representing Duquesne University's athletic interests are responsible for ensuring Duquesne University's commitment to integrity and NCAA rules compliance.

Early and frequent education is a key component of maintaining the principle of institutional control. Listed below is some important information that all alumni, athletics representatives, and fans, as well as current and prospective student-athletes and their families and friends should know.



2005-06 COMPLIANCE NEWSLETTERS:

NOVEMBER 2005
DECEMBER 2005
JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2006
MARCH 2006

RELATED INFORMATION:

  • Information All Alumni, Fans and Friends of DU Must Know
  • NCAA Web Site
  • Duquesne's Dukes Court Athletic Association
  • Booster Brochure





    Information All Alumni, Fans and Friends of Duquesne University Must Know

    Who is considered a representative of Duquesne University's Athletic Interests ("Boosters")?
    According to NCAA regulations, a representative of Duquesne University's athletics interests ("booster") is any person who:

    • Has ever been a member of any former Duquesne University Athletic Department Fan Support Group,
    • Has ever made a financial contribution to the Department of Athletics or any of our former Athletic Fan Support Groups,
    • Is or has ever been a season ticket holder in any sport,
    • Has ever helped arrange employment for or employed a current or prospective student-athlete, or
    • Has ever been involved, in any way, in the promotion of Duquesne University's athletics program.

    PLEASE NOTE: Once you become a representative of Duquesne University's athletics interest, you retain that identity indefinitely.

    Who is considered a prospective student-athlete?
    The NCAA defines a prospective student-athlete (PSA) as any student who has started classes for the ninth grade. In addition, any student who has not started classes for the ninth grade becomes a prospective student-athlete if the institution or a representative if the institution's athletics interests provides such a student (or a student's family or friends) with any financial assistance or other benefit(s) that the institution does not provide to prospective students generally.

    When is a prospect being recruited?
    In order to be considered a recruited prospect by NCAA definition, one or more of the following institutional actions must have occurred:

    • An institution provides a prospect with an official visit,
    • An institution has an in-person, off-campus encounter with a prospect or the prospect's parents, relatives, or legal guardian(s), or
    • An institution initiates or arranges telephone contact with a prospect, or the prospect's relatives or legal guardian(s), on more than one occasion.

    Who is permitted to be involved in the recruitment of prospective student-athletes?
    Only approved coaches and athletics department staff members are permitted to be involved in the process of recruiting prospective student athletes. Representatives of Duquesne University's athletics interests are prohibited from contacting a prospective student-athlete or members of his/her family by telephone, letter, electronic transmission or in-person for the purpose of encouraging participation in athletics at Duquesne University. If you know of a prospective student-athlete who may have the interest and ability to participate in intercollegiate athletics at Duquesne, you are only permitted to contact the appropriate Duquesne University coaching staff. That coach will then take appropriate action.

    When can an institution begin to recruit a prospect?
    Recruiting Material:
    An institution is permitted to send recruiting material [information about the institution's athletics program(s)] to a prospect beginning September 1 of the prospect's junior year in high school. Athletic questionnaires and camp brochures may be sent to a prospect prior to that date.

    Telephone Calls:
    General Rule- A coach may not initiate telephone contact with a prospect until July 1 following the completion of the prospect's junior year in high school. In addition, a coach may only make one telephone call to a prospect or that prospect's family each week. However, certain exceptions to this rule do exist:

    Football Exception- A coach may initiate telephone contact with a prospect on one occasion during the month of May of the prospect's junior year in high school. Subsequent to that one telephone call during the month of May, a coach may not call a prospect again until September 1 of the prospect's senior year in high school.

    Other Exceptions- A coach may make more than one telephone call to a prospect under the following circumstances, (1) during the five days prior to a prospect's official visit to that institution, (2) on the initial date for signing the National Letter-of-Intent and the two days following this date, and (3) on the day of a coach's scheduled off-campus contact with a prospect. In the sport of football, more than one telephone call may be made to a prospect during permissible off-campus contact periods and during the two days before an after the initial signing date for the National Letter of Intent.

    Off-Campus, Face-to-Face Contact:
    A coach may not arrange an off-campus face-to-face meeting with a prospect until July 1st following a prospect's junior year in high school.

    IMPORTANT REMINDER:
    Only a college coach, who has been certified by his/her institution and the NCAA, may recruit a prospect. Alumni and other representatives of an institution's athletics interests may not contact a prospect to encourage the prospect to attend a particular institution.

    What is an extra benefit?
    An extra benefit is any special arrangement by an institutional staff member or a representative of the institution's athletics interests to provide a prospective or enrolled student-athlete or his/her family with a benefit not specifically authorized by NCAA regulations. Extra benefits that are not authorized by NCAA regulations would include, but are not limited to:

    • Cash or loans of any amount,
    • Co-signing or arranging a loan,
    • Gifts of free services (e.g. airline tickets, restaurant meals, use of an automobile, etc.),
    • Rent-free or reduced cost housing,
    • Employment of a student-athlete at a rate higher than the wages paid for similar work, or
    • Payment to a student-athlete for work not performed.

    Any provision of an EXTRA BENEFIT to a prospective or currently enrolled student-athlete by an institutional staff member or athletics representative jeopardizes the athletics eligibility of that student-athlete. We urge you not provide a prospective or enrolled student-athlete with any benefit without first contacting the DU Athletics Compliance Office and James Alexander, Director of Compliance, at (412) 396-4917, to determine the permissibility of your actions.


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